Organizations

Want to implement the 10 day real food challenge within your organization?

Here are tips for doing the Challenge within a group. If you’d like to brainstorm together, email us.

Schools

Pick a 10 day date range that doesn’t compete with holidays, breaks, or other major events.

Set aside time to launch the Challenge, close the Challenge, allow students to read the material each day, and accommodate special activities.

Show a film, such as Sugar Coated or Fed Up.

Eliminate sweetened beverages, including juice. Offer water or unflavored milk only.

Replace processed snacks on the premises with real food, like fruit.

Encourage students to choose whole foods from the lunch line, like fresh fruits and vegetables.

Create a kid-friendly real food cookbook with submissions from families.

Start a school garden.

Couple the Real Food Challenge with a real food fundraiser.

As a math problem, calculate the number of teaspoons of sugar in popular processed foods.

Visually display the sugar content of sweetened beverages and snacks.

Ask students to find examples of surprising foods that contain added sugar in their own homes. Have them report back what the food was and what added sugar ingredients and grams of sugar the item contains.

Make a spelling test out of the 56 names for sugar.

Take photos. Share with the IRN to be featured on this site.

Implement a red, yellow, and green color-coding system for foods offered for sale on site.

Make a rule that all food at classroom parties should be real food.

Challenge home economics, hospitality, or culinary arts classes to focus solely on real food during the event. Have students create real food snacks that can be sold for fundraising or create real food recipes and compile into a cookbook.

Substitute water for sports drinks at sporting events.

Kickstart a school food project, like getting a cafeteria salad bar through grant programs like the Chef Ann Foundation or surveying students about what real food snacks they’d like to see offered in the a la carte line and then giving that information to the district.

Colleges

Pick a 10 day date range that doesn’t compete with holidays, breaks, exams, or other major events.  Consider making it an annual event!

Highlight real food options at campus eateries and dining halls. Ask each establishment if you can post a list of best choices for participants in the Real Food Challenge.

Invite professors of nutrition or public health to present a lecture or participate in a panel discussion about the benefits of real food.

Enlist members of nutrition, dietetics, public health, or gardening student organizations to host a real food fair. Station volunteers at a variety of tables each with a different project or brief lesson about real food.

Show a film, such as Sugar Coated or Fed Up.

Hold a real food cook-off or potluck.

Host a cooking demo with dorm-friendly techniques.

Establish a weekly farmers’ market on your campus, if there isn’t one already.

Take photos. Share on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter with #EatRealFood.

Create a campus real food cookbook.

Health care

Health care campuses should be conducive to attaining and maintaining good health. That means that not only should healthy options be available, they should be the norm.

Pick a 10 day date range that doesn’t compete with holidays, breaks, peak vacation times, or other events.  Consider making it a quarterly, semi-annual, or annual event.

Take stock. How many vending machines sell processed food and beverages? What can be done about it?

Show a film, such as Sugar Coated or Fed Up.

Incentivize healthy choices for the cafeteria’s #1 customer: employees.

Promote real food choices above processed food choices in retail settings with sales, product placement, and advertising.

Provide cooking lessons to clinicians and staff.

Prescribe real food and cooking classes to patients.

Develop educational handouts for patients about the benefits of real food. Start sharing them from clinics and before hospital discharges.

Consult your own resident expert. Have one of your own clinicians who is knowledgeable about the benefits of real food do a talk.

Start a journal club that discusses the latest research in nutrition.

Establish a weekly farmers’ market on the medical campus, if there isn’t one already.

Corporations

Pick a 10 day date range that doesn’t compete with holidays, breaks, peak vacation times, or major deadlines.  Consider making it a quarterly, semi-annual, or annual event.

Set aside time to launch the Challenge, close the Challenge, allow participants to read the material each day, and accommodate special activities.

Show a film, such as Sugar Coated or Fed Up.

Give away real food prizes, like a CSA membership.

Hold a real food cook-off or potluck.

Improve the food environment of your organization to be consistent with the Real Food Challenge. Involve everyone in the process.

Eliminate sweetened beverages. Offer water, unsweetened tea, unsweetened coffee, or milk instead.

Replace processed snacks with real food, like nuts and fresh fruit.

Create an organization-wide real food cookbook with submissions from your team.

Plant a garden on site.

Couple the Real Food Challenge with a real food drive for charity.

Take photos. Share on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter with #EatRealFood.

Implement a red, yellow, and green color-coding system for foods offered on site.

Make a rule that all food at office parties should be real food.

Create an inspiring real food library with cookbooks and books about food and health that can be borrowed.

Establish a weekly farmers’ market at your corporate park, if there isn’t one already.